How To Keep My Dog Warm Outside During Winter

Some dogs love snow, and you happen to have a four-footed friend at home who enjoys playing in the wet white stuff, it might not immediately occur to you that you must watch and make sure he/she stays safe and free of colds this winter. Looking for ways to keep your dog warm this winter? Here are a few tips to consider:

Get Him Some Warm Dog Boots

The snow and ice winter can make life miserable, especially when you have to go outside. It’s been proven that dogs, even though they have a natural fur coat, can be subject to frostbite and hypothermia if they stay out too long without clothes for protection. 

The best way to winterize your canine and get him ready for cold walks is to get him some dog boots. Booties and coats serve many vital functions, the most obvious of which is to keep a pouch warm when the temperature drops too low and to keep your dog dry.

A good quality boot will also serve to keep your canine dry as well as snug. Being wet and cold is the only thing worse than being cold, and dogs are much more difficult to dry off than humans. This is why keeping them dry while out on a walk is so important, and a hound jacket can easily accomplish this.

A good quality boot will also serve to keep your canine dry as well as snug. Being wet and cold is the only thing worse than being cold, and dogs are much more difficult to dry off than humans. My advice is to shop now while things are cheap and stock up so that your furry best friend is well covered.

Keep your pets indoors as much as possible

Yes, it will be necessary to walk your dogs when nature calls, but keeping them in a warm environment is easily the best way to ensure their good health.

Buy a dog sweater or jacket for outdoor trips

Some pet owners may balk at the idea of keeping a wardrobe for their dogs or cats, but if you have a sort-haired canine at home, a sweater can help against the cold.

Observe good paw care

While humans tend to lose heat through the tops of their heads, dogs may lose it from their feet. Walking on cold surfaces can bring a chill, so if you are able to find paw-sized boots for winter, get them.

Paw Protection Balm Against Salts

Imagine how cold your feet would get if you walked barefoot on the sidewalk in winter. A dog’s paw is not that different, and this is even truer for the small breeds, like Chihuahuas and Miniature Pinschers.

A sturdy pair dog shoes will also keep paws from touching rock salt or melting chemicals on the pavement. Salt will often cause doggie feet to crack, which is very painful. A good quality coat will also serve to keep your canine dry as well as snug.

Being wet and cold is the only thing worse than being cold, and dogs are much more difficult to dry off than humans. This is why keeping them dry while out on a walk is so important, and a hound jacket can easily accomplish this. Many coats also come with hoods to keep your furry baby’s head dry as well.

Make sure you rinse and dry your dog’s paws after walks and being outside during the winter. You can use either a warm, damp washcloth or a bucket of warm water to wash your dog’s feet and any other affected areas like the legs, belly, and face. It also cleans away any salt, sand, or other irritants that are used on the roads and sidewalks that can get on your dog’s pads.

Warm Dog Coats For Winter

Whether your dog is an indoor or outdoor dog, provide adequate shelter for your dog inside and out if your dog is outside for long periods, you need to make sure that he has a warm place to go to protect him from the cold weather and elements. It is imperative that your dog has an insulated dog house that can shelter them from the extreme cold.

All dogs can freeze to death, just because they have thick fur or are built to be an outdoor dog, don’t mean that they are not at risk. Understand that each town or city has specific laws about acceptable shelter, restraints, protection, and care of dogs.

Finally, failure to abide by the laws can be punishable by fines and even imprisonment. If you are unsure of what the laws are where you live, you can contact your local Animal Control, Humane Society, or even the ASPCA.